Pupil Premium 2016

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Pupil Premium 2016

Pupil Premium

What is it?

Pupil Premium is additional funding given to schools to close the between children eligible for free school meals (FSM) and their peers. National statistics show that these children often underperform even though they may have the same potential as their peers.

The pupil premium was introduced in April 2011 and is allocated to schools to work with pupils who have been registered for free school meals at any point in the last six years (known as ‘Ever 6 FSM’). Schools also receive funding for children who have been looked after by Children’s Services continuously over more than six months, and for children of armed forces personnel.

The Government believes that it is for schools to decide how the Pupil Premium Grant (PPG), allocated per eligible pupil, is spent, since they are best placed to assess what additional provision should be made for the individual pupils within their responsibility.

From September 2012, schools have been required to publish online information about how they have used the Premium. This is to ensure that parents and others are made fully aware of the attainment of pupils covered by the Premium. This information details the following:

  •         The amount of the school’s allocation from the Pupil Premium Grant in respect of the current academic year;
  •         Details of how it is intended that the allocation will be spent;
  •         Details of how the previous academic year’s allocation was spent
  •         The effect of this expenditure on the educational attainment of those pupils at the school in respect of who grant funding was allocated.

Funding is allocated within the school budget by financial year. This budget enables the school to plan its intervention and support programme. Expenditure is therefore planned and implemented by academic year as shown. As an inclusive school, Newton Flotman Church of England Primary strongly believes that no pupil should be disadvantaged as a result of background and ensures that resources and support are also provided for children who may not necessarily be eligible for free school meals or looked after, but who have been identified by the school as being at an educational disadvantage compared to their peers. This support is funded out of the School’s main budget. Programmes involving children who are eligible for the grant as well as those who are not are often part-funded by Pupil Premium, proportional to the children they benefit.

Academic Year 2015 – 2016: Pupil Premium Allocation: £43,560

After consultation with parents, staff, governors and pupils and with consideration of the EE Foundation toolkit it was spent on the following:

  •         Smaller class sizes
  •         Home visits
  •         Progress, pupil tracking & next steps meetings
  •         Parent Support Advisor (1 day per week)
  •         Homework club
  •         Interventions in reading, maths, anger management, emotional development and other areas
  •         Additional hours for Education Support Staff at the beginning of the school day to work with individuals
  •         Staff training
  •         Access to clubs
  •         Educational visits
  •         Enrichment opportunities e.g. music, dance, clubs

How it made a difference to the attainment of disadvantaged pupils:

Early Years Foundation Stage (Reception Class)

  •          In 2016 from low baselines, children made better than expected progress. 2 girls made better progress than 2 boys. Attainment was still low, but difference diminished.

Phonics

  •         100% of disadvantaged pupils achieved the expected standard in phonics in Year 1.

 

Key Stage 1

  •         Reading – 67% (2 out of 3) of disadvantaged children attained the nationally expected standard or higher compared to 78% of other children nationally.  The previous 3 year trend has shown the gap between children in school narrowing year on year.
  •         Writing – 33% (1 out of 3) of disadvantaged children attained the nationally expected standard or higher compared to 53% other children in school.   The previous 2 year trend has shown the gap between children in school narrowing year on year.
  •         Maths – 0% (0 out of 3) of disadvantaged children attained the nationally expected standard or higher.  The previous 3 year trend has shown the gap between children in school narrowing year on year.

Key Stage 2

  •         Reading – 40% (2 out of 5) of disadvantaged children attained the nationally expected standard or higher. For the previous 2 years 100% of disadvantaged children attained level 4 or higher.
  •         Writing – 40% (2 out of 5) of disadvantaged children attained the nationally expected standard or higher. For the 2 previous years 100% of disadvantaged children attained level 4 or higher.
  •         Maths – 40% (2 out of 5) of disadvantaged children attained the nationally expected standard or higher. For the 3 previous years almost all disadvantaged children attained level 4 or higher.

(During 2015 3 disadvantaged pupils with low attainment joined the school, making good progress whilst here but not attaining the expected standard in 2016.)

Unauthorised absence of disadvantaged pupils has improved. Involvement of disadvantaged pupils in extra-curricular activities remains strong, and continues to be supported by funding

Ofsted Raise Online Inspection Dashboard 2016 states:

“For KS1 disadvantaged pupils, attainment of at least the expected standard in all subjects for all EYFS development groups was close to or above national figures for other pupils, within one pupil below national. Persistent absence was low for all pupils and the FSM group (in the lowest 10%) and no group had high persistent absence (in the highest 10%).”

 

Academic Year 2016-17: Pupil Premium Allocation £52,480

Planned expenditure:

  •         Additional hours for Education Support Staff at the beginning of the school day to work with individuals
  •         Additional hours to support emotional and behavioural difficulties for individuals
  •         PATHS programme for emotional and social skills development across school – training, materials, implementation.
  •         Dedicated space for nurture for individuals – Rainbow Room
  •         Home visits for new intake
  •         Progress, pupil tracking & next steps meetings
  •         Parent Support Advisor (1 day per week)
  •         Homework club
  •         Interventions in reading, maths, anger management, emotional development and other areas
  •         Staff training
  •         Access to clubs
  •         Educational visits
  •         Residential visit to Kingswood
  •         Enrichment opportunities e.g. music
  •         Additional teaching assistant post supporting afternoon reading in KS2, extending to response to marking, additional maths.

Spring 2017 in-school progress:

Currently, in 11/15 subjects across year groups, progress of disadvantaged pupils is in line with other pupils. In only 3 cases it is below, and in 1 case it is significantly above.